Monday Memo 7/2/18

The Monday Memo

July 2, 2018                                                                           PITT DPT STUDENTS

Teaching the Hip Hinge:

Dowel Rod Hinge Mechanics

 

 

As an avid reader of the University of Pittsburgh’s Monday Memo, you likely understand the importance of mastering a proper hip hinge. A proper hinge is demonstrated when the subject bends primarily at the hips, recruiting the posterior chain while using the anterior core to lock down the ribcage and help provide spinal stability.

 

The Dowel Rod Hip Hinge is an excellent way to help your patients develop this motor pattern! Prescribing this movement as homework to help ingrain proper motor recruitment with frequency allows the therapist to accelerate motor learning, opening up the door for you to load the pattern in-clinic & challenge integrity by adding variables such as strength, speed, power, and instability.

 

Take a look at the video below for a quick lesson on identifying improper hip hinge mechanics and how to mix them!

 

EPISODE 89 | Dowel Rod Hip Hinge Mechanics . As we've discussed in the past two episodes, mastering a proper hip hinge is incredibly important. . A proper hip hinge helps the trainee recruit their posterior chain musculature: Glutes 🍑, hamstrings, spinal extensors. . Developing a strong posterior chain is UNDERRATED & can often help alleviate knee & back pain!💪🏽 . 🚨Here's a quick list of what you DON'T want to do!🚨 . ❌Allow the knees to cave inward . ❌Lift the toes up and roll onto your lateral foot . ❌Extend at the neck, leading to excessive spinal extension & loss of contact with the dowel . ❌Rounding at the back, increasing strain on the vertebral bodies/discs & losing contact w/ the dowel at the sacrum. . . So what makes a proper hip hinge??? . ✅ Screw the feet into the groun, creating external rotation torque that will help the knees travel out over the ankles for optimal force production 💪🏽 . ✅ Hips drive straight back, showing a smooth posterior weight shift 👍🏽 . ✅ Minimal forward knee travel, maximizing the tension on the posterior chain! 📈 . ✅ Maintain three points of contact with the dowel at all times ➡️ This ensures neutral spinal loading throughout the motion! 1️⃣ Back of the head 2️⃣ Between the shoulder blades 3️⃣ On the sacrum, between your butt cheeks! . . Questions, comments, concerns? Drop a line in the section below! . Please like & share this post with a friend who is always complaining of knee or back pain! They likely could use some hip hinging in their life! . #StoutTraining #DPTstudent #PosteriorChainGang #PerformBetter

A post shared by Charles Badawy SPT, CSCS, USAW (@coach.charlieb.spt) on

 

 

 

 

🚨Here’s a quick list of what you DON’T want to do!🚨

 

❌Allow the knees to cave inward

 

❌Lift the toes up and roll onto your lateral foot

 

❌Extend at the neck, leading to excessive spinal extension & loss of contact with the dowel

 

❌Rounding at the back, increasing strain on the vertebral bodies/discs & losing contact w/ the dowel at the sacrum.

 

 

What should we focus on?

 

✅ Screw the feet into the ground, creating external rotation torque that will help the knees travel out over the ankles for optimal force production 💪🏽

 

✅ Hips drive straight back, showing a smooth posterior weight shift 👍🏽

 

✅ Minimal forward knee travel, maximizing the tension on the posterior chain! 📈

 

✅ Maintain three points of contact with the dowel at all times ➡️This ensures neutral spinal loading throughout the motion!

1️⃣ Back of the head

2️⃣ Between the shoulder blades

3️⃣ On the sacrum, between your butt cheeks!

July 2, 2018 |

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