Monday Memo 5/14/18

The Monday Memo

May 14, 2018                                                                           PITT DPT STUDENTS

Two Runner Specific Pelvic Stability Drills

 

Most serious runners know the importance of strong glutes, but may not understand how they complement & interact w/ the hip flexors! It’s accurate to describe these muscle groups as being antagonistic, because they perform opposite functions, but this is too simplistic in my opinion.

 

In reality, these muscle groups complement one another in functional movement! We can think of one group stabilizing & locking down the pelvis, allowing a strong, stable platform for the other to produce force!

 

Let’s dive into this concept w/ two stability drills that focus on this concept of “pelvic stability” from opposing ends.

 

EPISODE 114 | Two Runner Specific Pelvic Stability Drills . Most serious runners know the importance of 💪🏽 glutes, but may not understand how they complement & interact w/ the hip flexors! . It's accurate to describe these muscle groups as being antagonistic, because they perform opposite functions, but this is too simplistic imo. . In reality, these muscle groups complement one another in functional movement! . We can think of one group stabilizing & locking down the pelvis, allowing a strong, stable platform for the other to produce force! . Let's dive into this concept w/ two stability drills that attack it from opposing ends. . . 1️⃣Supine Psoas March . Here the hip flexors work to maintain pelvic position as we extend the other hip using our glutes. . If the glutes were left unchecked, they would pull the pelvis into a posterior tilt & limit the amount of force we can apply to the ground in gait. . Instead, the band activates our hip flexors, allowing them to produce a contraction that maintains stability. . In the case of weak & dysfunctional hip flexors, we may see compensation patterns from the other stabilizing muscles, such as the muscles in our lower back, in which we would likely see arching of the lumbar spine. . Taking this a step further, this drill can carryover to backside running mechanics, or our ability to exert force to the ground & propel forward. . 2️⃣Glutebridge Psoas March . Here we see just the opposite! . The sustained glutebridge provides a constant contraction that stabilizes our pelvis as we drive our knee to our chest using our hip flexors. . W/out functional glutes, the hip flexor contraction would spill our pelvis forward into an anterior pelvic tilt. . This is often the case in runners who fail to recognize the importance of strength training & can lead to back pain, muscle strains, & an inability to reach their full potential. . Applying this to the gait cycle, this is truly a frontside mechanics drill. The importance of driving your knee forward is often overlooked, but good luck generating any sort of speed on hills or during a true sprint w/out effective strong hip flexors. . #StoutTraining #DPTstudent #PerformBetter

A post shared by Charles Badawy SPT, CSCS, USAW (@coach.charlieb.spt) on

 

1. Supine Psoas March

  • What’s happening:
    • Here the hip flexors work to maintain pelvic position as we extend the other hip using our glutes. If the glutes were left unchecked, they would pull the pelvis into a posterior tilt & limit the amount of force we can apply to the ground in gait. Instead, the band activates our hip flexors, allowing them to produce a strong isometric contraction that maintains stability.
    • Applying this to running, this drill can provide carryover to backside running mechanics, or our ability to exert force to the ground & propel forward. We’re training our hip extensors to contract in a dynamic (concentric/eccentric) fashion with this drill.
  • What to look out for:
    • In the case of weak & dysfunctional hip flexors, we may see compensation patterns from the other stabilizing muscles, such as the muscles in our lower back, in which we could see arching of the lumbar spine. The trainee will likely feel the movement less in their anterior core and more so in their lumbar erectors if this is the case.
    • In addition, the trainee may drive into excessive lumbar flexion. The trainee may still feel the exercise in their hip flexors and anterior core, but they’ll likely lack the sensation of stiffness and power in the hip extensors of the extending leg.

Glutebridge Psoas March

  • What’s happening:
    • Here we see just the opposite! The sustained glutebridge provides a constant isometric contraction that stabilizes our pelvis as we drive our knee to our chest using our hip flexors. In contrast to the Supine Psoas March, we’re now training our hip flexors to contract dynamically! They produce a strong concentric contraction as you drive knee-to-chest and contract eccentrically to fight the band with the return to the starting position in a controlled manner.
    • Applying this to the gait cycle, this is truly a frontside mechanics drill. The importance of driving your knee forward is often overlooked, but it will be difficult generating any sort of speed on hills or during a true sprint w/out effective strong hip flexors.
  • What to look out for:
    • Without functional glutes, the hip flexor contraction may spill our pelvis forward into an anterior pelvic tilt. In addition, the trainee will likely have difficulty simply maintaining the starting position. In this case, it would likely benefit the individual to choose another drill, such as a Glutebridge March and/or Single-Leg Glutebridge variations, paired with hip flexor strengthening that don’t demand the same type of performance from the glutes.

-Charlie Badawy, SPT, CSCS, USAW

 

May 14, 2018 |

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