Monday Memo 10/9/17

Interpreting Hip Pain

 

Currently, the 1st year DPT students are approaching our musculoskeletal exam involving the evaluation, assessment, and treatment of the hip. I thought it would be appropriate to post a hypothetical case study of presentation that we may potentially see on our exam or in the clinic.

 

Case: A patient comes into your clinic for groin pain. He is a 65-year-old independent male. You begin taking his history and discover the following; the pain began two weeks ago, but he cannot recall a specific event that brought on his discomfort and the pain is located in his lateral hip. He also tells you that at first, the pain would be worst after he had been gardening for hours, but now, he notes that the pain comes on even when doing something as simple as getting his newspaper from the driveway. He then tells you that he also has been feeling pain on the medial side of his knee. Upon further questioning, he reveals that he has had trouble sleeping because of the pain.

 

Using this information, think about what further questions you would want to ask and what tests and evaluation methods you would use to create differential diagnoses for this patient. Depending on what you believe to be a possible diagnosis, determine how you would decide to treat this patient.

 

-James Tersak, SPT, CSCS

October 9, 2017 |

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