The Monday Memo: 6/22/2015

The Monday Memo

June 22, 2015                                                                             PITT DPT STUDENTS

“Noah Galloway”

For so many people, the loss of a limb is catastrophic.  The physical and emotional toll it can wreak on a person cannot be put into words.  Often people initially feel that their lives will be permanently and irreversibly limited due to their loss.  And while they have undoubtedly lost a physical part of themselves, it is the duty of their family and their therapist to show them that it is just a step towards a new life and new opportunities.

 

Take Noah Galloway for instance.  Growing up a highly competitive athlete, Galloway joined the Armed Forces during operation Iraqi Freedom.  It was during his second tour that he was hit by an IED (improvised explosive device) which sent him into a coma for five days.  Upon awakening, he found that he had lost his left arm as well as his left leg.  The news was devastating, especially to a 23 year old that had to that point lived a very active life.  However, through all of his hardship and despair, he found a way to accept what had happened and look to what could be from that day forward.

 

Galloway took what many label a “disability” and turned it into his strength.  He put himself to work getting back in shape, learning to walk and run again.  Then he truly began to push himself.  Galloway worked from running laps to running Tough Mudders, obstacles and all.  With his one arm and leg, he has competed in CrossFit events and was even a finalist on Dancing with the Stars; even going so far as to earn top honors from Men’s Health.  Now a personal trainer and motivational speaker, Noah Galloway has found the light through the cracks of his once shattered world, and rebuilt himself as an inspiring figure for all those that lose a part of themselves to amputation.

 

SPOTLIGHT:  Congratulations to Arielle Berman, Nick Hamilton, and Becky Russell for completing their Olympic triathlon in Toronto this past weekend, and hats off to Carlos Darby purely for surviving his 70.5 mile trail run.  Way to stay be active PT’s!

 

 

-Michael Turnwald

 

Check the Calendar for Class Schedules and Events

Social Media Updates
  • #DPTstudent –  WEDNESDAYS , 9-10pm EST!   Check out #DPTstudent page for details!
  • Unite Physical Therapy Students – If you haven’t yet, please check out the “Doctor of Physical Therapy Students” Facebook page. More than 9,500 students have already joined!
  • Our own page! Pitt Physical Therapy, thanks to the Social Media Team, has created an official PittPT Facebook page!
  • #SolvePT (meets on Tuesdays Twitter from 9-10pm EST)
June 22, 2015 |

The Monday Memo: 6/8/2015

Monday Memo

June 8, 2015                                                                             PITT DPT STUDENTS

“Social Responsibility”

What is Social Responsibility?

 

This is the response that many Physical Therapy Students find themselves asking when first being introduced to the APTA’s Core Values early in their career. According to the APTA, Social Responsibility is the promotion of a mutual trust between the profession and the community, one that necessitates responding to societal needs for health and wellness. For this very reason, students from the Physical Therapy Department decided to create a Team Webpage for this year’s Walk to Cure Arthritis in Pittsburgh.

 

Our group of students attended the walk on May 31st with the intention of showing the community that we as young, aspiring physical therapists will be by their side while they are enduring the hardships that arthritis has brought to their friends and family. The Arthritis Walk gave many of us the opportunity to lend moral support to a community that we are deeply devoted to.

 

The first half of the day went as expected: we explored the different activities and booths offered by the Arthritis Foundation, and went off to walk with the other participants to show the community the resilience that lives within many patients and families suffering from arthritis. The second half however, was eye-opening, and an experience that I’m sure we all felt privileged to be a part of.

 

While walking back to the event center, we came upon an elderly lady who had just finished bidding farewell to her friends and was now slowly making her way towards the rear end of the pack of walkers. After realizing that she was a participant of the walk, we decided to turn around and tag along with her to ensure her safety. The walk ended up taking a little longer than expected for us, but her smile and sense of achievement after finishing was well worth the extra time spent.

 

Between the conversation and constant supervision, I realized that in that hot day, in that lonesome street, we were all the support this pleasant, elderly lady had. If we had not been there, who else would have redirected her rollator to avoid it from going over the sidewalk every 50 feet? How many people are trained to safely guard people while making it seem as if they are simply walking naturally beside them so as to not make them nervous? And finally, how many other people would have been able to pick up on the likelihood that she might suffer from underlying diseases aside from her obvious impairments, and consequently prompt her to assess how she felt with regards to her ‘sugar’?

 

At a time in which leaders of our field are currently doing everything they can to attain feasible Direct-Access to our clinicians, it is paramount that we realize the importance that this example can be generalized to. Just as that lady was solely dependent on us that day (save her water bottle and banana), our patients might present to our clinics in a very similar situation. It is our duty both to our profession and communities to be prepared to meet these important demands; letting either of these groups down is NOT an option.

 

-Carlos Darby

 

Spotlight: Pitt PT Students for raising over $2,000 for this year’s Walk to Cure Arthritis!

 

 

Check the Calendar for Class Schedules and Events

Social Media Updates
  • #DPTstudent –  WEDNESDAYS , 9-10pm EST!   Check out #DPTstudent page for details!
  • Unite Physical Therapy Students – If you haven’t yet, please check out the “Doctor of Physical Therapy Students” Facebook page. More than 9,500 students have already joined!
  • Our own page! Pitt Physical Therapy, thanks to the Social Media Team, has created an official PittPT Facebook page!
  • #SolvePT (meets on Tuesdays Twitter from 9-10pm EST)
June 8, 2015 |

The Monday Memo: 6/1/2015

Monday Memo

June 1, 2015                                                                             PITT DPT STUDENTS

What is Your “Why”?

 

“People don’t buy WHAT you do, they buy WHY you do it.”

 

This phrase is echoed continuously throughout Simon Sinek’s book, “Start with Why”.  In it, Sinek makes the case for using your “Why”, your purpose and reason for doing what you do, as the main selling point for businesses and companies, big or small.  The go-to example of a company employing this principle is Apple, whose drive and motivation to change the way people interact serves as the primary sticking point for its products.  Apple attracts folks to their devices because their “Why” is so strong; their innovative ideology draws costumers in by appealing to their visceral desire to be different, even revolutionary.

 

As Doctors of Physical Therapy in training, our focus is heavily on the “What”: the techniques, the treatment, the assessment procedures, the tests and measures.  But our “What” does not travel far without the “Why”.   What is your purpose for treating patients? What inspires you to be great? What drives you to improve?  What is your “Why”?

 

A strong sense of purpose becomes paramount to our success as Doctors of Physical Therapy.  Our “Why” sets us apart and connects us to our patients in vital ways.  Cultivating our skills in Physical Therapy means refining our motivation, and our drive to be great.

 

To the Pitt DPT Class of 2018, make your “Why” a central part of your education.  Best of luck as your start your new journey!

 

– Jeremy Harris

 

 

Check the Calendar for Class Schedules and Events

Social Media Updates
  • #DPTstudent –  WEDNESDAYS , 9-10pm EST!   Check out #DPTstudent page for details!
  • Unite Physical Therapy Students – If you haven’t yet, please check out the “Doctor of Physical Therapy Students” Facebook page. More than 9,500 students have already joined!
  • Our own page! Pitt Physical Therapy, thanks to the Social Media Team, has created an official PittPT Facebook page!
  • #SolvePT (meets on Tuesdays Twitter from 9-10pm EST)
June 1, 2015 |

The Monday Memo: 5/25/2015

Monday Memo

May 25, 2015                                                                             PITT DPT STUDENTS

“Misconceptions”

Anyone that has spent time in the clinic knows that there is a large portion of people, medical professionals included, that do not understand what physical therapists do or what they are capable of doing.  Often times it is the client coming in for no other reason than their doctor won’t let them get surgery unless they go to PT first.  However, it can be seen in referrals from multi-disciplinary professionals for cases of “leg pain” or “shoulder pain” or simply “modalities.”  It is not widely known that PT’s can possess Direct Access and see clients without referral, even though Direct Access has been around for decades.  Most importantly, we cannot take these things as an assault on our profession; rather, we must realize that these misconceptions are the product of lack of knowledge and naiveté.

 

Currently, there is a bill making its way through the Texas legislature that would give Physical Therapists greater allowances of Direct Access.  The bill is being fiercely opposed by the state’s chapter of the American Medical Association which states that PT’s don’t possess the knowledge or training to properly diagnose musculoskeletal disorders or identify red flags of more serious pathologies.  The AMA also claims that it is more financially efficient to see a PCP and acquire imaging prior to attending physical therapy.  However, both facts can be readily refuted with evidence from both physical therapy and medical journals.

 

This is a misconception that desperately needs to change, and we can all play a role.  Cooperation is key to changing the way that Physical Therapy is perceived.  This includes working with every type of healthcare professional as well as informing and educating the clients in the clinic about the benefits of PT.  Changing the way that Physical Therapy is seen by others is not a goal easily achieved, but it is attainable.

 

SPOTLIGHT:  Congratulations to John Schneider on the birth of his new baby boy!  And welcome to the incoming Pitt DPT Class of 2018 as they begin their professional education this Monday!

 

-Michael Turnwald

 

Check the Calendar for Class Schedules and Events

Social Media Updates
  • #DPTstudent –  WEDNESDAYS , 9-10pm EST!   Check out #DPTstudent page for details!
  • Unite Physical Therapy Students – If you haven’t yet, please check out the “Doctor of Physical Therapy Students” Facebook page. More than 9,500 students have already joined!
  • Our own page! Pitt Physical Therapy, thanks to the Social Media Team, has created an official PittPT Facebook page!
  • #SolvePT (meets on Tuesdays Twitter from 9-10pm EST)
May 27, 2015 |

The Monday Memo: 5/18/2015

The Monday Memo

May 18, 2015                                                                             PITT DPT STUDENTS

“Tomatoes or Potatoes”

Patients in the clinic often ask, how long did you have to go to school to become a PT?, and are surprised to hear that it takes so long.  They talked with another PT last week at the gym and it only took him a few weekends and certifications.  Or, another [healthcare provider] got his PT license over a weekend course.  To the layman, and some professionals, “PT” is an overly-generalized term, used to mean anyone that has some background in prescribing exercise.  To those knowledgeable, PT means Physical Therapist, not personal trainer, and not a physiotherapist “certification” that is often offered as an adjunct to some disciplines.  Comparing tomatoes to potatoes.

 

Physical Therapy is defined by its ability to examine, evaluate, diagnose, and treat musculoskeletal disorders.  Prescribing exercise is only a small, and relatively simple part of what we as professionals do.  Even though this responsibility is shared by other professions, Physical Therapists are specially trained in what to do and, more importantly, what NOT to do.  Being aware of the contraindications to exercise is essential to preventing further injury and allowing proper treatment of an injury.  Personal trainers and continuing-ed attendees do not have the depth or breadth to properly assess and treat such musculoskeletal issues.

 

The danger with this confusion is not only to our patients who may seek help from people less qualified than they believe, but also to us as a profession.  It is necessary for the public to have correct perception of physical therapists, PT’s, as the musculoskeletal experts that they are.  This must happen in order to progress the advancement of the profession.  We cannot keep comparing tomatoes and potatoes.

 

Note:  Physiotherapist, internationally, is the equivalent of a physical therapist in the US.  It is the domestic “certification” that is sometimes offered that needs to be watched.

 

-Michael Turnwald

 

Check the Calendar for Class Schedules and Events

Social Media Updates
  • #DPTstudent –  WEDNESDAYS , 9-10pm EST!   Check out #DPTstudent page for details!
  • Unite Physical Therapy Students – If you haven’t yet, please check out the “Doctor of Physical Therapy Students” Facebook page. More than 9,500 students have already joined!
  • Our own page! Pitt Physical Therapy, thanks to the Social Media Team, has created an official PittPT Facebook page!
  • #SolvePT (meets on Tuesdays Twitter from 9-10pm EST)
May 19, 2015 |